High Street Blues – 1989

Not to be confused with the popular US Police show of a similar name.  The title almost seems relevant now, with the major changes sen on the British High Street in recent years.  However back in 1989, High Street Blues was a one off sitcom, lasting just one series of six episodes.

It was written by Jimmy Perry, an otherwise hugely successful comedy writer and a TV producer Robin Carr.  The show went out early Friday evenings on ITV, not greatly received by it’s critics and featuring a cast of relatively unknown actors it flopped.

Taking into account it’s broadcast year, we would assume it still exists somewhere in the archives, but to our knowledge it’s never had a repeat outing.

Summary

The owners of four little high street shops find themselves under threat from the big boys as major retailer – Waverley’s Supermarkets plan to build a hypermarket. To make matters worse they want to demolish their shops in order to build it!

It’s the ultimate fight for survival. However, there’s a traitor in the pack as there is one shopkeeper among them who would be quite happy to do a deal with the “Dirty Deeds Department” of the slick supermarket chain.

Clips

No clips are available and we were unable to find any commercial DVD release.  It’s a shame really as what flopped years ago, may be an altogether different story now.

Cast

Phil McCall  –  Charlie McFee
Ron Pember  – Chesney ‘Ches’ Black
Elizabeth Stewart  –  Mavis Drinkwater
Valerie Walsh – Rita Franks
Johnny Shannon – Sharpe
Martin Turner – Valentine
Shirley Dixon – Managing Director
Eve Bland – Sheila
Chris Pitt – Bob Farthing
Victoria Hasted – Susan Drinkwater
Georgia Mitchell – Paula Franks

Details

Channel: ITV
Written By: Jimmy Perry and Robin Carr
Produced By: London Weekend Television for ITV
Producer and Director: Robin Carr
Original Transmission Dates: 6th January – 10th February 1989

 

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