Hancock, 1963

There are a surprising number of sitcoms either starring or written by well known names that perhaps could be classed as…..but not as you know them.  This ITV series is a perfect example.

When you think Hancock you automatically think of his work for the BBC, this ITV series is often forgotten, which is a shame as whilst it lacks the polish of the partnership with Galton and Simpson, it is still classic Hancock.

Tony Hancock had left the BBC in 1961 to pursue a career on the big screen.  The result was his ill feted second cinema outing, The Punch and Judy Man in 1962,

Following the failure of The Punch and Judy Man to kick start his career in films Hancock returned to his sitcom roots.

Hancock not to be confused with his final BBC series of the same name was the third of five series he did with ITV.

Broadcast around the same time as Steptoe and Son, the series was generally not well received and was Hancock’s last regular television series.  It ran for one series of thirteen twenty five minute episodes in 1963.

Summary

In much the same vane as Hancock’s Half Hour, he reprises his character of the pompous fool, and his timing is as good as ever, the ATV series followed Hancock in a different situation each week.

Clips

 

 

 

 

Starring

Tony Hancock

Details

Channel: ITV (ATV)
Written By: Godfrey Harrison
Original Run: 3rd March 1963 – 28th March 1963

Extras

All 13 episodes are thought to exist although there are only 6 in the public domain.  Some sites advise that Roger Hancock (Tony’s brother) does not want to see them broadcast or released to any other media as he does not feel they hold up as a good quality example of his work. However having viewed the few episodes that are in the public domain, it is clear that whilst it’s not Galton and Simpson’s classic  scripts, it’s still quality Tony Hancock.

The problem is that in it’s original form Hancock’s Half hour was a masterpiece of British sitcom, everything fitted together brilliantly the cast executed Galton and Simpson’s superb scripts to perfection. 

As for critiscism of this series both writers and Hancock had decided to move on, just as Galton and Simpson went onto have a great many successes elsewhere, fans perhaps never let Hancock move on.  This series wasn’t Hancock’s Half Hour but it’s still funny and fans should be allowed to view it and make their own minds up.

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One Response

  1. W.Pinner

    While I can understand the Hancock estate’s point of view to some extent I still believe that his fans deserve the chance to see the whole series.Look at it this way-the potential purchasers of the series on DVD would all be Hancock fans and would do so in the knowledge that the ATV series was not up to the standard of the BBC series .(Then again you could arguably count on one hand those that would be.)Finally, having watched the six episodes that are currently ‘available’ I judge them far superior and definitely more enjoyable to watch for fans than the tragic final Australian series that is readily available on DVD. So go on, give the fans what they want while they are still alive to enjoy them!

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