At Last the 1948 Show – 1967

When people talk of comedy greats there is someone who often gets overlooked.  That someone is Marty Feldman.

At Last The 1948 show was his first TV outing, although he had some well known writing credits to his name before this, Round The Horne being one such example.

The show had nothing to do with the year 1948; the title referred to television executives’ tendency to dither extensively over commissioning decisions.

The show had it’s beginnings when David Frost approached John Cleese, Graham Chapman and Tim Brooke-Taylor to star in a sketch series, it was they who suggested Marty Feldman, who up until this point had been a writer,  join.

The show connected the radio series I’m Sorry, I’ll Read That Again, television’s Monty Python’s Flying Circus and The Goodies.

Two series of: At last The 1948 show were made totalling thirteen 25-minute episodes during the series’ ten-month run, six in the first and seven in the second.  Of the thirteen episodes currently eleven survive in the archives.

Many of the show’s sketches have appeared in some of our best loved comedy shows such as Monty Python and The Two Ronnies.

Summary

Essentially the classic format of short sketches.

Clips

 

 

 

 

Cast

Tim Brooke-Taylor
Graham Chapman
John Cleese
Marty Feldman
Aimi MacDonald

Details

Channel: ITV
Created By:
Tim Brooke-Taylor
Graham Chapman
John Cleese
Marty Feldman
Original Transmission Dates: 15th February 1967 – 7th November 1968

Archive Status

It is believed that 73% of the original output still exists today.  Out of an original total of 13 episodes, only one episode remains almost completely missing, seven exist complete, and five are incomplete.  Those that are incomplete consist of footage recovered from five compilation tapes returned from Sweden.  The audio of all 13 episodes exist, recorded off air by several fans. Only for the last episode no complete audio recording is known.  The majority of a previously missing episode (season 2, episode 6 tx 31.10.67) was returned to the BFI in May 2010, so when totalled up we have 73%

 

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